Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Excusing Away Nigga Dysfunction In The Schools

[Okay, this is one of those articles that is flying around the rite-wing internet. These things are hard to reproduce here on blogspot because they have all kinds of weird formats and embedded links and graphics, so forth and so on, but I'll give it a shot. - HAC]

 

The "Behavioral Education Plan."

Needed because black people don't behave in the public schools of America (or, for that matter, in the pre-K Classrooms). 

 
The future's so bright... when racial differences exist in behavioral patterns for Pre-K students, it's time to rethink that whole "race is social construct" mantra; equality is the social construct, with the loaded gun of the state pointed at anyone who disagrees

George Orwell meets Aldous Huxley meets a city where the Newark World Order (NWO) is willingly being implemented.

[Redefining discipline in Madison schools, The Cap Times (Madison), 3-19-14]:

Discipline in Madison's public schools is harsh for African-American kids, many of their parents say. They insist the system targets black children, setting them up to be exiled from class, written up, suspended, even expelled. Schools push out the very students who are falling behind their white classmates, according to test scores and graduation rates.
And the unequal treatment starts in the early grades when their children are very young, African-American parents say.
"They start with your child when they first get them, to take away whatever self-pride they walk into that school system with," says one African-American mother, leafing through pages of behavior reports on her son. "You have a child who will grab their book bag, grab their sister's book bag, want to go start the car they are so ready and eager to go to school. But when they get there, things start happening."
The mother, whose name is being withheld to protect the identity of her child, says the behavior reports started when her high school-age son was in elementary school. The reports cite repeated incidents that she says are attempts by a child with special needs to cope. They include incidents labeled "repeated physical aggression" that she reads as horseplay among kids rather than an attack by one child on another.
"They are seeing my child all day. They are affecting my child," she says. "They are the ones who can boost them, or bring them down."
Jennifer Cheatham, superintendent of the Madison Metropolitan School District, says she has heard similar accounts from African-American parents who believe their kids have been unfairly marked as trouble makers.
"I can't tell you how many African-American parents I've talked with who have told me those stories," Cheatham says. "I've heard enough of them to believe there is real truth there. I think the work we're doing really is about addressing head-on our racial bias and the assumptions we may make of students who are in the classroom."

Madison schools impose thousands of out-of-school suspensions each school year, resulting in thousands of days of instruction lost. In the 2012-2013 school year, for example, there were 3,863 out-of-school suspensions, resulting in 6,075 lost days of instruction.
Students of color, disabled students and students living in poverty are suspended from school at much higher rates than others. For example, 20 percent of African-American students and 11 percent of multi-racial students received at least one out-of-school suspension last year, compared to 5 percent of Hispanic students and 3 percent of white students.
Among special education students, 19 percent were suspended at least once last year, compared to 4 percent of students who are not in special education programs. And 12 percent of low-income students were suspended at least once, compared to 2 percent of students not from low-income families.
Among 112 students expelled in the last four school years, 62 percent were African-American, 19 percent were white and 12 percent were Hispanic.
Cheatham and other school officials are convinced that the current code's deficiencies lead to disparities in rates of suspension and expulsion.
"Our current code is based on a zero tolerance approach to some behaviors that doesn't give students the opportunity to learn from their misbehavior," Cheatham says. "And it doesn't provide sufficient opportunity for adults to understand where the behavior is coming from and respond to it in a supportive way to help the child address the underlying issues."
The proposed new code of conduct – renamed the Behavioral Education Plan – reduces the violations that can result in suspension and expulsion. School officials calculate that if the proposed code had been in effect last school year, nearly one-third of out-of-school suspensions would not have occurred and lost days of instruction would have been reduced by nearly 20 percent. The percentage share of high school suspension for African-American students would have dropped from 64 percent to, at most, 60 percent, they say.
The Madison district is undertaking its revision of discipline policy as school systems across the country are jettisoning get-tough approaches that push students out of school in favor of models that keep kids in the classroom and work to help them change their behavior. Responding to research reporting that disparately high suspension and expulsion rates among African-American students feed the school-to-prison pipeline, large school districts are pulling back from "zero tolerance" in Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, Baltimore and Broward County, Fla., where more than 1,000 students were arrested in 2011.
A landmark study in Texas this year analyzed millions of school discipline and juvenile justice records, finding that African-American students and those with learning disabilities were disproportionately removed from the classroom for disciplinary reasons. The study also tracked links between suspension and expulsion and dropping out of school and entering the juvenile justice system.
John Bauman, Dane County Juvenile Court administrator, says he too often encounters young people entering the juvenile justice system when a confrontation at school spins out of control.
"A kid is noncompliant for whatever reason – a bad day, mental health issues, feeling he's not being listened to," Bauman says. "He's sent out of class to the office, but continues to be unruly – loud and boisterous – and security staff or the school police officer gets involved. The kid resists, fights back, knocks something over, and you've got a disorderly conduct or a criminal battery charge."
"I've seen it so many times – kids not being able to stop," he says. "I'd like to think if there were adults with good connections to the kids, they might be able to reach them and stop the escalating behavior."
Once they are involved, police officers often feel they don't have any option but to bring a student who is out of control to the juvenile court system, Bauman says. And even if the child is not placed in taken into custody, the incident begins the process of establishing a record, Bauman says.
Having a "record" in the juvenile justice system – or at school – sets up a kid for more scrutiny and unfair punishment, says a 19-year-old man now finishing his high school education in an alternative program after dropping out of Madison schools following multiple suspensions and a near expulsion after almost fistfighting with a staff member.
"Because I had a history, every time something went wrong, they were looking for me," the young man says. "I'd be in a group, maybe the only black person, and the first person they come to when something happens is me," he says. "Other people could say 'he didn't do it' – they'd still blame me."
"African-American kids don't come to school, because they treat us different," he says.
And he says many white teachers are afraid of African-American students.
We live in a country where we are being conditioned to never notice black people, unless it's in an unapologetically positive fashion.

Even in a city (75 percent white Madison, Wisconsin) where white privilege is taught to represent the ultimate sin, the true privilege is blacks ability to claim racism whenever unpleasant metrics arise showcasing their collective inadequacies. 

That black individuals act up and disrupt classrooms, well, that could be bad; but when aggregated together, obviously there is a nationwide conspiracy at work to ensure the school to prison pipeline remains unmolested.

Here's a simple solution to fix the problem: no longer discipline blacks; no longer arrest blacks; no longer punish blacks; and no longer hold blacks accountable to any standards governing proper behavior. 

Wouldn't that be a true "Behavioral Education Plan?"

If you are white and if you have kids (grand kids, nieces, nephews, etc. ) get them the hell out of public school. 

4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

When the goal is to destroy whitey and make nigroids unaccountable for their subhuman behavior, this article makes perfect sense!

12:02 PM  
Anonymous Dave said...

Public school equals child abuse. You got it right in A distant Thunder.

3:42 PM  
Anonymous AnalogMan said...

That's another article from Stuff Black People Don't Like.

9:39 AM  
Anonymous Nova Arya said...

and let us not forget the divergence known as a Whiger" that is whites who have absorbed black culture and act black.
I once taught at an all black school an finally was able to find a job is a majority white school. I was so disappointed to find the difference now between blacks and whites is no longer differences in kinds but in degrees! Many times on bus duty I would hear a car behind me in the student parking lot blaring Rap music at ear splitting decibels, only to turn around and see it was a carload of white males. White males idolize Negro rap stars and athletes. In majority white schools the race mixing is ten times worse with almost all Black and Mexican students having white girlfriends that they walk had in hand with down the hall. I did not see that at schools in which whites were a minority, the racial cohesion was far greater!
The American South is nothing but a bizarre combination of Soul Train and Hee Haw!
As Confucius said: show me the music of a nation and I will tell you the health of its people!

9:16 PM  

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